Sunday, November 10, 2019

An Experience, with the Big Bang?


Suddenly it was completely clear. I could understand it! It was an unbelievably complex, yet self-explanatory evolution of concentric patterns growing out of concentric patterns; like self-generating, hyper-dimensional mandalas recursively blossoming, like flowers, out of the centers of previous hyper-dimensional mandalas, ad infinitum, but with a single point of origin from where it all emanated. This point of origin, this Source of it all, however, remained elusive: hidden behind the layers of wonders growing outwards from it. Somehow, the way new patterns unfolded and evolved was already entirely encoded in, and determined by, the very shapes, angles, and proportions entailed by previous patterns, so that no new primary information was ever added to the thing as it evolved. The entire story was already fully contained in it from the very beginning, and it was simply unpacking and manifesting itself in all its indescribable glory. It was a thing of startling power and beauty, yet put together with a level of sophistication and perfection that goes way beyond anything I could compare it to. ... This was the answer to the question that haunted me my entire life: ... One simply needed to “look” at it with the mind’s eye to know that this is how reality came to being; this is how nature was formed. ... All of reality seems to be the unfolding of a thought pattern in the imagination. Dreamed Up Reality by Bernardo Kastrup

See: The Symbolic Big Bang

See Also:Fractals and Antennas

Wednesday, November 06, 2019

Exoplanet Webcast



In her Nov. 6 talk at Perimeter Institute, astrophysicist and author Elizabeth Tasker will take audiences for a speculative stroll through a few of the alien worlds we’ve discovered in the galaxy, and ponder whether someone else may already call them home.
See:Homes away from home: a live webcast on exoplanets

You can move ahead to around 13.16 to start the program if in a hurry.

Music of the Universe



"In a special public lecture webcast at Perimeter Institute on October 23, 2019, Gabriela González will provide a first-hand account of LIGO’s century-in-the-making breakthrough, and explain observations made as recently as this year. González, a professor of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University and former spokesperson of the LIGO collaboration, will take the audience on a journey to some of the universe’s most violent places, and explain how such distant events can lead to a very bright future here on Earth."
See: Music of the Universe: Gabriela González public lecture

Sunday, November 03, 2019

Cern: Want to know what we do underground when the LHC is being upgraded?



Cern: Want to know what we do underground when the LHC is being upgraded? Watch an immersive experience in 360° from the underground CMS Experiment cavern to watch an international team of scientists, engineers and technicians insert precious pieces of newly developed technology.
See: 360° from the CMS cavern at CERN - 8K

Monday, October 28, 2019

Communal Intelligence: A Talk By Seth Lloyd

By Dmitry Rozhkov - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

We haven't talked about the socialization of intelligence very much. We talked a lot about intelligence as being individual human things, yet the thing that distinguishes humans from other animals is our possession of human language, which allows us both to think and communicate in ways that other animals don’t appear to be able to. This gives us a cooperative power as a global organism, which is causing lots of trouble. If I were another species, I’d be pretty damn pissed off right now. What makes human beings effective is not their individual intelligences, though there are many very intelligent people in this room, but their communal intelligence.See: Communal Intelligence

"To arrive at the edge of the world's knowledge, seek out the most complex and sophisticated minds, put them in a room together, and have them ask each other the questions they are asking themselves."See: Edge Cast

Also See: The Edge.org

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Microsoft Alternatives project (MAlt)


The Microsoft Alternatives project (MAlt) started a year ago to mitigate anticipated software license fee increases. MAlt’s objective is to put us back in control using open software. It is now time to present more widely this project and to explain how it will shape our computing environment.
See:
Microsoft Alternatives project (MAlt)

Guest Post: A conversation with Lee Smolin about his new book "Einstein’s Unfinished Revolution"

Smolin is a faculty member at the Perimeter Institute for
Theoretical Physics in Canada and adjunct professor at the University of
Waterloo. He is one of the founders of loop quantum gravity. In the
past decades, Smolin
’s interests have drifted to the role of time in the laws of nature and the foundations of quantum mechanics.

Sunday, June 09, 2019

Bernardo Kastrup's defence of second PH.D.



This is the complete record of Bernardo's defense of his second Ph.D., on philosophy of mind and ontology, at Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherland's best classical university in 2018), plus the degree granting ceremony. It was recorded on 29 April 2019, in the 'Aula' of Radboud University. The defense was held in English. For the thesis, click on: https://philpapers.org/rec/KASAIA-3 The thesis is a companion volume to Bernardo's book 'The Idea of the World':

See:https://youtu.be/XcMOape0PY8
See also:Metaphysical Speculations

Saturday, March 02, 2019

Secrets of Cymatics



"Secrets of Cymatics" is an inspirational presentation by acoustic-physics researcher, John Stuart Reid, filmed at the Water Conference, Sofia, Bulgaria, October 2016, on the physics, chemistry and biology of water. The title of the talk was originally "The Holographic Properties of Water" and focuses on the CymaScope instrument and the emergent science of Cymatics, including significant implications for medical science and positing the first two laws of Cymatics.

See Also: Cymascope

Friday, March 01, 2019

Robert Myers named as Perimeter Institute's new Director


Wednesday, February 13, 2019

What Can We Learn From Bizarre Phenomena? with Bernardo Kastrup


See Also: What Can We Learn From Bizarre Phenomena? with Bernardo Kastrup

Bernardo Kastrup, PhD, is a computer scientist. He is author of Rationalist Spirituality, Why Materialism is Baloney, Dreamed Up Reality, Meaning in Absurdity, Brief Peeks Beyond, More Than Allegory, and The Idea of the World. He has published several papers in Scientific American arguing for metaphysical idealism. Here he reviews a number of nonsensical events ranging from bizarre UFO encounters to religious miracles to psychedelic visions and dreams. He suggests that there are certain common themes that run through dreams, fantasies, and reports of paranormal occurrences -- and that they all speak to us symbolically. He also proposes that the deep archetypes of the Jungian collective unconscious can manifest in what we think of as the physical world. New Thinking Allowed host, Jeffrey Mishlove, PhD, is author of The Roots of Consciousness, Psi Development Systems, and The PK Man. Between 1986 and 2002 he hosted and co-produced the original Thinking Allowed public television series. He is the recipient of the only doctoral diploma in "parapsychology" ever awarded by an accredited university (University of California, Berkeley, 1980). He is past-vice-president of the Association for Humanistic Psychology, and is the recipient of the Pathfinder Award from that association for his contributions to the study of consciousness. (Recorded on January 3, 2019)

Saturday, February 02, 2019

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

The Mother of All Demos

 

See: Mother of All Demos

***
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.[1]
The live demonstration featured the introduction of a complete computer hardware and software system called the oN-Line System or, more commonly, NLS. The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work). Engelbart's presentation was the first to publicly demonstrate all of these elements in a single system. The demonstration was highly influential and spawned similar projects at Xerox PARC in the early 1970s. The underlying technologies influenced both the Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows graphical user interface operating systems in the 1980s and 1990s.
***


See Also:

Quantum to Cosmos: explore the scale of the universe