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Showing posts with label Nanotechnology. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nanotechnology. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Quantum Music



Quantum: Music at the Frontier of Science - QNC Performance

Published on Oct 19, 2012 The Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony and the Institute for Quantum Computing teamed up on Sept. 29, 2012, to present an innovative musical experiment called "Quantum: Music at the Frontier of Science." The concert served as the the grand finale of the grand opening celebrations of the Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre at the University of Waterloo. Through narration, an eclectic musical programme, live narration and "sound experiments," the concert explored the surprisingly parallel paths followed by quantum science and orchestral music over the past century. The concert was created over the period of a year through meetings and brainstorming sessions between KW Symphony Music Director Edwin Outwater and researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing.

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012

NanoTechnology



Nanotechnology (sometimes shortened to "nanotech") is the manipulation of matter on an atomic and molecular scale. Generally, nanotechnology works with materials, devices, and other structures with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometres. Quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale. With a variety of potential applications, nanotechnology is a key technology for the future and governments have invested billions of dollars in its research. Through its National Nanotechnology Initiative, the USA has invested 3.7 billion dollars. The European Union has invested 1.2 billion and Japan 750 million dollars.[1]

Nanotechnology is very diverse, ranging from extensions of conventional device physics to completely new approaches based upon molecular self-assembly, from developing new materials with dimensions on the nanoscale to direct control of matter on the atomic scale. Nanotechnology entails the application of fields of science as diverse as surface science, organic chemistry, molecular biology, semiconductor physics, microfabrication, etc.

Scientists debate the future implications of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology may be able to create many new materials and devices with a vast range of applications, such as in medicine, electronics, biomaterials and energy production. On the other hand, nanotechnology raises many of the same issues as any new technology, including concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials,[2] and their potential effects on global economics, as well as speculation about various doomsday scenarios. These concerns have led to a debate among advocacy groups and governments on whether special regulation of nanotechnology is warranted.



 

 The most scientifically sophisticated building ever constructed at the University of Waterloo, this one-of-a-kind centre will facilitate transformational research with applications spanning computing, communications, medicine and beyond. Shared by the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) and the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN), this building provides our researchers with the tools and opportunities to unlock the amazing power of quantum information science and the boundless potential of nanotechnology. The groundbreaking discoveries that happen here will continue Waterloo’s long tradition of research excellence and innovation through the 21st century.


See: Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre  and  Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology




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Monday, October 01, 2012

Scienceshow/Nanotechnology

PictureThis
 
 This show sequence contains material for easily more than 2 hours of stand-up nanotechnology show with plenty of hands-on activities to keep the audience occupied for much longer. There is a kind of red thread going through the show, but emphasis is on showing the wide variety of nanoscale phenomena people will see in their every day life or that can be demonstrated without complicated setupNanotechnology Demonstration Experiments and Hands-on Activities

See AlsoThe Opensource Handbook of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology



Historical developments-

Monday, November 23, 2009

An Idea: Percolating to the Surface

If one cannot see the dynamical relation toward "localization of the energy" it will never make sense how such energy can be used to advance sustainability. While they are close in the thinking, the idea, still remains apart from acknowledgement of the substance of the proposal.

Thin-Film Solar with High Efficiency

Solexant is printing inorganic solar cells with nanomaterials.

Solar cells made from cheap nanocrystal-based inks have the potential to be as efficient as the conventional inorganic cells currently used in solar panels, but can be printed less expensively. Solexant, a company in San Jose, CA, is currently manufacturing solar cells to test the technology. In order to compete with other thin-film solar companies, Solexant is banking on simpler, cheaper printing processes and materials, as well as lower initial capital costs to build its plants. The company expects to sell modules for $1 per watt, with efficiencies above 10 percent.
Nanocrystal solar: The solar cells at top were made on a roll-to-roll printer from an ink consisting of the rod-shaped inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals shown below. The cells were printed on a flexible metal foil and will be topped with a glass plate.
Credit: Solexant

The company has licensed methods for growing nanocrystals and making them into inks from Paul Alivisatos, professor of nanotechnology at the University of California, Berkeley and interim director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (Alivisatos is on Solexant's board of directors.) Alivisatos says the advantage of these materials is their potential to combine low cost with high performance. Solar cells made from crystalline silicon are efficient at converting sunlight into electricity, but they're expensive to manufacture. To bring down the cost, companies have been developing thin-film solar cells from semiconductors that don't match crystalline silicon's performance but are much less expensive to make.

Solexant's goal is to make cheap thin-film solar cells with relatively high efficiencies. It would not disclose what the nanoparticle inks are made of, but the company says they are suspensions of rod-shaped, semiconducting nanocrystals that are four nanometers in diameter and 20 to 30 nanometers long. The Solexant cells are printed on a metal foil as the substrate. Nanocrystal films are simple to print but have poor electrical properties. Electrons tend to get trapped between the small particles. "The trick with these cells is how to deposit the materials on the fly in a way that makes a very conductive surface," which in turn ensures decent light-to-electricity conversion, says Alivisatos. Solexant begins with nanocrystals because they're easier to print, and heats them as they're printed, causing them to fuse together into larger, high-quality microcrystals that don't have as many places for electrons to lose their way.
The remaining parts of the solar cell, including the electrical contacts and a light-absorbing layer, are also printed on the flexible metal films. This process allows Solexant to print very large areas. When complete, the cells are cut and then topped with a rigid piece of glass.



I wanted to keep a record of these links for examination so besides the blog posting here, a direct link to the authors of this record keeping.


Evidence of Solar PV, Battery and Conservation Advancements


Solar PV



Batteries and Storage




Conservation and Efficiency



Electric Vehicles





Friday, March 23, 2007

Solidification of Geometrical Presence

While I might infer the "attributes of Coxeter here," it is with the understanding such a dimensional perspective which has it's counterpart in the result of what manifests as matter creations. Yet we have taken our views down to the "powers of ten" to think of what could manifest even before we see the result in nature.

When you go to the site by PBS of where, Nano: Art Meets Science, make sure you click on the lesson plan to the right.



Buckyballs

Visitors' shadows manipulate and reshape projected images of "Buckyballs." "Buckyball," or a buckminsterfullerene molecule, is a closed cage-structure molecule with a carbon network. "Buckyball" was named for R. Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller (1895-1983), a scientist, philosopher and inventor, best known for creating the geodesic dome.
Photo Credit: © 2003 Museum Associates/Los Angeles County Museum
Fundamentally the properties of materials can be changed by nanotechnology. We can arrange molecules in a way that they do not normally occur in nature. The material strength, electronic and optical properties of materials can all be altered using nanotechnology.


See Related information on bucky balls here in this site. This should give some understanding of how I see the greater depth of what manifest in nature, as solids in our world, has some "other" possibilities in dimensional attribute, while it is given association to the mathematical prowess of E8.

I do not know of many who will take in all that I have accumulated in regards to how one may look at their planet, can have the depth of perception that is held in to E8.?

One may say what becomes of the world as it manifest into it's constituent parts, has this energy relation, that it would become all that is in the design of the world around us.



While some scientists puzzle as to the nature of the process of E8, little did they realize that if you move your perception to the way E8 is mapped to 248 dimensions, the image while indeed quite pleasing, you see as a result.

It can include so much information, how would you know that this object of mathematics, is a polytrope of a kind that is given to the picture of science in the geometrical structure of the bucky ball or fullerene.

Allotropes



Diamond and graphite are two allotropes of carbon: pure forms of the same element that differ in structure.
Allotropy (Gr. allos, other, and tropos, manner) is a behaviour exhibited by certain chemical elements: these elements can exist in two or more different forms, known as allotropes of that element. In each different allotrope, the element's atoms are bonded together in a different manner.

For example, the element carbon has two common allotropes: diamond, where the carbon atoms are bonded together in a tetrahedral lattice arrangement, and graphite, where the carbon atoms are bonded together in sheets of a hexagonal lattice.




Note that allotropy refers only to different forms of an element within the same phase or state of matter (i.e. different solid, liquid or gas forms) - the changes of state between solid, liquid and gas in themselves are not considered allotropy. For some elements, allotropes can persist in different phases - for example, the two allotropes of oxygen (dioxygen and ozone), can both exist in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. Conversely, some elements do not maintain distinct allotropes in different phases: for example phosphorus has numerous solid allotropes, which all revert to the same P4 form when melted to the liquid state.

The term "allotrope" was coined by the famous chemist Jöns Jakob Berzelius.

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Coxeter and Plato's Cave



IN Beyond the Dance of the Sun I give an image of Plato's Cave for consideration, about dimensinal perspectve.

This is not only held in my mind in terms of what free people are chained in their perspectives, but I also feel, that the leading characteristics were kindly put forward not only by my own position, but by those who I have listed throughout this blog.

Bolya, Heisenberg and Hooft?

There are "no wares" here to market(no advertising) other then what perception has granted me by "learning" and assuming the inherent nature of the leading perspectves in geometries and their relation to the real world.

Visitors' shadows manipulate and reshape projected images of "Buckyballs." "Buckyball," or a buckminsterfullerene molecule, is a closed cage-structure molecule with a carbon network. "Buckyball" was named for R. Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller (1895-1983), a scientist, philosopher and inventor, best known for creating the geodesic dome.


Imagine then, that such nanotechnology sites have taken us down to microperspectives and there are such things in the "geometry of being" that would dictate the technolgies that we use?

Was it so distant from the real world that such "projective geometries" exposed the correlation of knowledge from a man like Coxeter, that you would say "I would rather demomnstrate the technological aspect because this is real?"

You know you had to be more suttle then this. You knew you had to think of the sun's ray and "think" beyond in the Sun/Earth Relation in a lagrangian perspective. But you refuse?

It is better then, that the cynics remain chained. And allow themselves to spread their venom about the callousness of "good people who had ventured forth" and asked about dimensional perspective. Who is it, that remains in the box?

Focus then, on the science and what has been accomplished. You need no further explanation. No "back reaction" to what constituted this science.

HOUSTON, Texas, Oct. 31 -- Nobel laureate Richard Smalley, co-discoverer of the buckyball and widely considered to be one of the fathers of nanotechnology, died Friday at the age of 62 after a long battle with cancer.
Rice University professor Smalley shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in chemistry with fellow Rice chemist Robert Curl and British chemist Sir Harold Kroto for the 1985 discovery of a new form of carbon nicknamed buckyballs. Shaped like soccerballs and no wider than a strand of DNA, buckyballs each contain 60 carbon atoms arranged in a hollow sphere resembling two conjoined geodesic domes. Smalley coined the name "buckminsterfullerene" for the discovery in honor of architect and geodesic dome inventor Buckminster Fuller.

Fullerenes -- the family of compounds that includes buckyballs and carbon nanotubes -- remained the central focus of Smalley's research until his death. According to colleagues, Smalley's belief that nanotubes were a wonder material that could solve some of humanity's problems -- such as clean energy, clean water and economical space travel -- led him to crusade for more public support for science and to help found a business, Carbon Nanotechnologies Inc., in 2000 to make sure his discoveries made it to the marketplace where they could benefit society. Smalley was convinced that nanotubes could only be used to solve society's problems if they were manufactured in bulk and processed economically.


The socialogical foundation of thinking about our world here then is a far cry from the very foundationof the geometries and how human being may envision. How they may descend into mind. Thre posisbilties are endless,a nd I would just point to the images of flowers and the kalidescope they cause, as they reveal strange nodes and anti-nodes brought forth in mandalic pattern interpretations.

What symmetry is this, that we can create such patterns and see how beautiful they are? Some like Clifford like th easymmetry of certain flowers?

Again such liminocentric structure are a inhernet part of our consciousness developement and following this process, into reality is a very important step. Some will only like the pictures and some will venture deeper. That's always be the way of it.

How would I know this?:)