Monday, March 26, 2018

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Illustris Simulation


See: Illustris Simulation

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This movie shows the formation of one of the Aquarius halos we simulated, over nearly the full age of the Universe from redshift z~50 to z=0. The camera position moves slowly around the forming galactic halo, pointing towards its centre at all times. The movie is based on our Aq-A-2 simulation. See: Aquarius Project Visualizations
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See Also:

Time Travelers

By Unknown - Netflix, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=62395143
Travelers is a science fiction television series created by Brad Wright, starring Eric McCormack, Mackenzie Porter, Jared Abrahamson, Nesta Cooper, Reilly Dolman and Patrick Gilmore.[1][2] The series is a co-production between Netflix and Showcase. The first season comprises 12 episodes and premiered on Showcase on October 17, 2016; the entire series premiered globally on Netflix on December 23, 2016.[3] On February 8, 2017, Netflix and Showcase renewed the series for a second season, which premiered on Showcase in Canada on October 16, 2017. The second season was then released worldwide, outside Canada, on Netflix on December 26, 2017.[4][5]
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See Also:

Can We Change The Past? by

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Joe Rogan talks to physicist Sean Carroll

What Reality Is.







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The Necker cube is used in epistemology (the study of knowledge) and provides a counter-attack against naïve realism. Naïve realism (also known as direct or common-sense realism) states that the way we perceive the world is the way the world actually is. The Necker cube seems to disprove this claim because we see one or the other of two cubes, but really, there is no cube there at all: only a two-dimensional drawing of twelve lines. We see something which is not really there, thus (allegedly) disproving naïve realism. This criticism of naïve realism supports representative realism. Necker cube -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necker_cube#Epistemology


The Necker cube is a paradigmatic example for bistable perception where pattern reversal obeys a particular probability distribution. Atmanspacher, Filk and Römer (2004) discussed this switching dynamics in terms of the quantum Zeno effect where “observation” (here attending to a percept) increases the dwell-time of an otherwise fast decaying unobserved state. Quantum Cognition, Bistable perception
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See Also:

Friday, February 09, 2018

Simulation Theory 2018 What is the Truth?


Testing Simulation hypothesis physically
A long-shot method to test one type of simulation hypothesis was proposed in 2012 in a joint paper by physicists Silas R. Beane from the University of Bonn (now at the University of Washington, Seattle), and Zohreh Davoudi and Martin J. Savage from the University of Washington, Seattle.[11] Under the assumption of finite computational resources, the simulation of the universe would be performed by dividing the continuum space-time into a discrete set of points. In analogy with the mini-simulations that lattice-gauge theorists run today to build up nuclei from the underlying theory of strong interactions (known as Quantum chromodynamics), several observational consequences of a grid-like space-time have been studied in their work. Among proposed signatures is an anisotropy in the distribution of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, that, if observed, would be consistent with the simulation hypothesis according to these physicists.[12

Simulation Theory 2017, We are waking up!!!!


Technicum as a New Age

Thursday, February 08, 2018

The Riddle of the Quantum Sphinx: Robert Spekkens Public Lecture



In his Feb. 7 public lecture at Perimeter Institute, Robert Spekkens will explain why he believes that many quantum mysteries are a result of a category mistake concerning the nature of quantum states.

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

Sack's and Ulam Spiral

Numbers on the marked curve are of the form

x2 + x + 41,

the famous prime-generating formula discovered by Euler in 1772. http://www.numberspiral.com/index.html

 Riemann discovered a geometric landscape, the contours of which held the secret to the way primes are distributed through the universe of numbers.

It seemed the patterns Montgomery was predicting for the way zeros were distributed on Riemann’s critical line were the same as those predicted by quantum physicists for energy levels in the nucleus of heavy atoms. The implications of a connection were immense: If one could understand the mathematics describing the structure of the atomic nucleus in quantum physics, maybe the same math could solve the Riemann Hypothesis. http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/prime_numbers_get_hitched/

Sack's spiral-a version of the Ulam spiral





 Sift the Two's and Sift the Three's,
The Sieve of Eratosthenes.
When the multiples sublime,
The numbers that remain are Prime.

Anonymous[5]

Tuesday, February 06, 2018

Albrecht Durer's Magic Square

Albrecht Dürer (/ˈdʊərər, ˈdjʊərər/;[1] German: [ˈalbʁɛçt ˈdyːʁɐ]; 21 May 1471 – 6 April 1528)[2] was a painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe when he was still in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints. He was in communication with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael, Giovanni Bellini and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 he was patronized by emperor Maximilian I. Dürer is commemorated by both the Lutheran and Episcopal Churches. The Expulsion From Paradise by Albrecht Dürer Dürer's vast body of work includes engravings, his preferred technique in his later prints, altarpieces, portraits and self-portraits, watercolours and books. The woodcuts, such as the Apocalypse series (1498), are more Gothic than the rest of his work. His well-known engravings include the Knight, Death, and the Devil (1513), Saint Jerome in his Study (1514) and Melencolia I (1514), which has been the subject of extensive analysis and interpretation. His watercolours also mark him as one of the first European landscape artists, while his ambitious woodcuts revolutionized the potential of that medium. Dürer's introduction of classical motifs into Northern art, through his knowledge of Italian artists and German humanists, has secured his reputation as one of the most important figures of the Northern Renaissance. This is reinforced by his theoretical treatises, which involve principles of mathematics, perspective, and ideal proportions.

Melencolia I 1514

Albrecht Dürer's magic square

Detail of Melencolia I
 
The order-4 magic square Albrecht Dürer immortalized in his 1514 engraving Melencolia I, referred to above, is believed to be the first seen in European art. It is very similar to Yang Hui's square, which was created in China about 250 years before Dürer's time. The sum 34 can be found in the rows, columns, diagonals, each of the quadrants, the center four squares, and the corner squares (of the 4×4 as well as the four contained 3×3 grids). This sum can also be found in the four outer numbers clockwise from the corners (3+8+14+9) and likewise the four counter-clockwise (the locations of four queens in the two solutions of the 4 queens puzzle[36]), the two sets of four symmetrical numbers (2+8+9+15 and 3+5+12+14), the sum of the middle two entries of the two outer columns and rows (5+9+8+12 and 3+2+15+14), and in four kite or cross shaped quartets (3+5+11+15, 2+10+8+14, 3+9+7+15, and 2+6+12+14). The two numbers in the middle of the bottom row give the date of the engraving: 1514. The numbers 1 and 4 at either side of the date correspond respectively to the letters "A" and "D," which are the initials of the artist.




Donald Hoffman: Consciousness and The Interface Theory of Perception


Monday, February 05, 2018

Memories of a Theoretical Physicist

By The original uploader was Lumidek at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Magnus Manske using CommonsHelper., Public Domain, Link

While I was dealing with a brain injury and finding it difficult to work, two friends (Derek Westen, a friend of the KITP, and Steve Shenker, with whom I was recently collaborating), suggested that a new direction might be good. Steve in particular regarded me as a good writer and suggested that I try that. I quickly took to Steve's suggestion. Having only two bodies of knowledge, myself and physics, I decided to write an autobiography about my development as a theoretical physicist. This is not written for any particular audience, but just to give myself a goal. It will probably have too much physics for a nontechnical reader, and too little for a physicist, but perhaps there with be different things for each. Parts may be tedious. But it is somewhat unique, I think, a blow-by-blow history of where I started and where I got to. Probably the target audience is theoretical physicists, especially young ones, who may enjoy comparing my struggles with their own. Some disclaimers: This is based on my own memories, jogged by the arXiv and Inspire. There will surely be errors and omissions. And note the title: this is about my memories, which will be different for other people. Also, it would not be possible for me to mention all the authors whose work might intersect mine, so this should not be treated as a reference work.See: Memories of a Theoretical Physicist by Joseph Polchinski

Simulation Hypotheses


The simulation hypothesis proposes that all of reality, including the earth and the universe, is in fact an artificial simulation, most likely a computer simulation. Some versions rely on the development of a simulated reality, a proposed technology that would seem realistic enough to convince its inhabitants the simulation was real. The hypothesis has been a central plot device of many science fiction stories and films.

Sunday, February 04, 2018