Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Being is an Objectification of the EGO

Is 'Being' The Same For Everyone?


Being is an Objectification of the EGO

So what do I mean. The commonality of the question posted by Ala Noe is to suggest that there is something that is the same between all of us. I pondered this,  as I look at what becomes self-evident in our pursuit of meaning "as being" is the same.

A first principle is a basic, foundational, self-evident proposition or assumption that cannot be deduced from any other proposition or assumption.

I descend to the objectified state,  as the same being.  What does this mean then that any self evident position must realize that we move from first principles. Hence,  establish an apriore existence as to our being "as more" then the commonality that we exist "as the EGO" modifies to become the objectification as us all being. A construct of this reality then? You see how much more we have in common then what was first believe as "being the same," for everyone?

 We are confined to the outward marks, the mere behavior — and that's just not enough to know another, to really understand him or her, or to trust.
So then the reality of an objectified existence placed as the outward language of appearance preceded by, an understanding of our EGO manufactured. A materialist definition of all action as a dire result of the expression of being, as our "measure of being." But we are more are we not, then by its appearance and the question of skepticism,  of there being more then?

So yes there is more then the social constructed fabrication as the outward appearance of the commonality of our being. The measure,  of our being. So we must look past outward appearance to a more soulful understanding of the projection of an objectified world. The relation of Virtues toward our relation with regard to first principle "is" an inherent relation to being more soulful. A more soulful country then as a more soulful world rests in our being a more soulful person?


René Descartes

For the Rationalist philosopher René Descartes, virtue consists in the correct reasoning that should guide our actions. Men should seek the sovereign good that Descartes, following Zeno, identifies with virtue, as this produces a solid blessedness or pleasure. For Epicurus the sovereign good was pleasure, and Descartes says that in fact this is not in contradiction with Zeno's teaching, because virtue produces a spiritual pleasure, that is better than bodily pleasure. Regarding Aristotle's opinion that happiness depends on the goods of fortune, Descartes does not deny that these goods contribute to happiness, but remarks that they are in great proportion outside one's own control, whereas one's mind is under one's complete control. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtue#Ren.C3.A9_Descartes