Wednesday, June 08, 2016

Base Reality?



Elon Musk, "There’s a one in billions chance we’re in base reality" Written by Jason Koebler, Motherboard.
The strongest argument for us being in a simulation, probably being in a simulation is the following: 40 years ago, we had pong, two rectangles and a dot,” Musk said. “That is what games were. Now 40 years later we have photorealistic 3D simulations with millions of people playing simultaneously and it’s getting better every year. And soon we’ll have virtual reality, augmented reality, if you assume any rate of improvement at all, the games will become indistinguishable from reality.

Progression can stop in this base reality.....and science goes no further due to a calamity that wipes out the human race?

A thought that stuck out in my mind.

As I went through comparative labels,  some things that came up were regarding quantum gravity, or the physics of organic chemistry. How would a simulation hypothesis explain these things.

Click the image to open in full size.
This symbol was used to demonstrate in a global sense that everything is derived from bits. Taken from a speech given by John Archibald Wheeler in 1999.  Also from, J. A. Wheeler: Journey into Gravity and Spacetime (Scientific American Library, Freeman, New York, 1990),  pg. 220


 Abstraction lives in the land of the simulations as information for consciousness? It only becomes real,  physically, as a matter orientated state of expression?

 But in the same breathe,

    To my mind there must be, at the bottom of it all,
    not an equation, but an utterly simple idea.
    And to me that idea, when we finally discover it,
    will be so compelling, so inevitable,
    that we will say to one another,
    “Oh, how beautiful !
    How could it have been otherwise?” From a personal notebook of Wheeler circa 1991

An idea then.


It was designed by the RobotCub Consortium, of several European universities and is now supported by other projects such as ITALK.[1] The robot is open-source, with the hardware design, software and documentation all released under the GPL license. The name is a partial acronym, cub standing for Cognitive Universal Body.[2] Initial funding for the project was 8.5 million from Unit E5 – Cognitive Systems and Robotics – of the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme, and this ran for six years from 1 September 2004 until 1 September 2010.[2]

The motivation behind the strongly humanoid design is the embodied cognition hypothesis, that human-like manipulation plays a vital role in the development of human cognition. A baby learns many cognitive skills by interacting with its environment and other humans using its limbs and senses, and consequently its internal model of the world is largely determined by the form of the human body. The robot was designed to test this hypothesis by allowing cognitive learning scenarios to be acted out by an accurate reproduction of the perceptual system and articulation of a small child so that it could interact with the world in the same way that such a child does.[3]

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