Tuesday, July 30, 2013

ScienceCasts: The Sound of Earthsong



A NASA spacecraft has recorded eerie-sounding radio emissions coming from our own planet. These beautiful "songs of Earth" could, ironically, be responsible for the proliferation of deadly electrons in the Van Allen Belts.

 
EARTH: If you're squeamish, you may not want to listen to the strange whistle of ultra-cold liquid helium-3 that changes volume relative to the North Pole and Earth's rotation. 





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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Information Loss

You see, people are uncomfortable with this information loss. It’s the minority view.Pg 64, The Cyclic Universe: A Conversation with Roger Penrose

I am certainly uncomfortable with it, as I have always seen it from the idea  as to what is current in the field of discussion around blackholes and such. So there are things going on as I am reading the pdf discussion with Roger Penrose.  I am also listening to Susskind's lecture while correlating the perspective that is being talked about by Roger Penrose.





I am adding this link just for some perspective about information and the presence of an anomaly that I perceive for such rules about past and future, and the topic of will. This as it relates too, the whole gamut of the science and investigation of what truly exists in terms of information.  Most surely,  I have some issues to deal with:)

Monday, July 22, 2013

The Universe of Sound: Subodh Patil - Collide@CERN Inspiration Part



Dr. Subodh Patil is a cosmologist at CERN and is the inspiration partner for Bill Fontana, 2012-2013 Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN winner, during his residency at CERN. Bill began his 3-month residency at CERN at an event called "The Universe of Sound" on July 4th, 2013, in the CERN Globe of Science & Innovation. In this excerpt from this event, Dr. Patil explains the parallels between physics, cosmology, sound, and music.
Watch the video of Bill Fontana's talk here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Zjy8v...




See:

Bernie Krause: The voice of the natural world


http://www.ted.com/talks/bernie_krause_the_voice_of_the_natural_world.html

Bernie Krause has been recording wild soundscapes -- the wind in the trees, the chirping of birds, the subtle sounds of insect larvae -- for 45 years. In that time, he has seen many environments radically altered by humans, sometimes even by practices thought to be environmentally safe. A surprising look at what we can learn through nature's symphonies, from the grunting of a sea anemone to the sad calls of a beaver in mourning. 

Monday, July 15, 2013

The Universe of Sound: Bill Fontana - Collide@CERN Artist


Bill Fontana is a renowned American sound sculptor who studied with John Cage and is the 2012-2013 Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN winner. He began his 2-month residency at CERN with an event entitled "The Universe of Sound" on 4 July 2013, in the CERN Globe of Science & Innovation, from which this excerpt was taken. Guided by his mantra, "All sound is music," Fontana gives samples of his previous work as well as some hints of what is to come during his residency. 

Watch the video of Dr. Subodh Patil, CERN cosmologist and inspiration partner for Bill Fontana: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mCkKD...

 Find out more via http://arts.web.cern.ch/collide/digit...





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Wednesday, July 10, 2013

The black-hole information paradox, complementarity, and firewalls by Leonard Susskind


The black-hole information paradox, complementarity, and firewalls by Leonard Susskind,

Stanford University, at the University of California, Santa Cruz Institute for the Philosophy of Cosmology July 5, 2013

http://hipacc.ucsc.edu/IPC2013.html

Monday, July 08, 2013

Math and the Mona Lisa


How did Leonardo da Vinci use math to influence the way we see the Mona Lisa? And how does our visual system affect our perception of that, and other, works of art? A look at math, biology and the science of viewing art.Math and the Mona Lisa
Just to note this radio program at NPR was back in 2004.




New possibilities opened up by the concept of four-dimensional space (and difficulties involved in trying to visualize it) helped inspire many modern artists in the first half of the twentieth century. Early Cubists, Surrealists, Futurists, and abstract artists took ideas from higher-dimensional mathematics and used them to radically advance their work.[1]Fourth dimension in art

Sunday, July 07, 2013

Dimensionality


See:
Cumrun Vafa: Strings and the magic of extra dimensions


 "Yet I exist in the hope that these memoirs, in some manner, I know not how, may find their way to the minds of humanity in Some Dimensionality, and may stir up a race of rebels who shall refuse to be confined to limited Dimensionality." from Flatland, by E. A. Abbott
Flat Land: A Romance of Many Dimensions

Again given a framework that is schematically written, how can we lay over top of it, analogies that fit? IN a sense, there is a certain amount of liberation and freedom granted when such schematics are revealed.

The value of non-Euclidean geometry lies in its ability to liberate us from preconceived ideas in preparation for the time when exploration of physical laws might demand some geometry other than the Euclidean. Bernhard Riemann


While being revealed as a dimensional foundation, this shows that while being abstract, there is a possible connection to the real world, and that is the work that must take place. Possible connection, may even be written and explain dimensionally?
Oskar Klein proposed that the fourth spatial dimension is curled up in a circle of very small radius, i.e. that a particle moving a short distance along that axis would return to where it began. The distance a particle can travel before reaching its initial position is said to be the size of the dimension. This, in fact, also gives rise to quantization of charge, as waves directed along a finite axis can only occupy discrete frequencies. (This occurs because electromagnetism is a U(1) symmetry theory and U(1) is simply the group of rotations around a circle).

Similarly, the laws of gravity and light seem totally dissimilar. They obey different physical assumptions and different mathematics. Attempts to splice these two forces have always failed. However, if we add one more dimension, a fifth dimension, to the previous four dimensions of space and time, then equations governing light and gravity appear to merge together like two pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. Light, in fact, can be explained in the fifth dimension. In this way, we see the laws of light and gravity become simpler in five dimensions.Kaku's preface of Hyperspace, page ix para 3

"Why must art be clinically “realistic?” This Cubist “revolt against perspective” seized the fourth dimension because it touched the third dimension from all possible perspectives. Simply put, Cubist art embraced the fourth dimension. Picasso's paintings are a splendid example, showing a clear rejection of three dimensional perspective, with women's faces viewed simultaneously from several angles. Instead of a single point-of-view, Picasso's paintings show multiple perspectives, as if they were painted by a being from the fourth dimension, able to see all perspectives simultaneously. As art historian Linda Henderson has written, “the fourth dimension and non-Euclidean geometry emerge as among the most important themes unifying much of modern art and theory.Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey

My most recent research is about extra dimensions of space. Remarkably, we can potentially "see" or "observe" evidence of extra dimensions. But we won't reach out and touch those dimensions with our fingertips or see them with our eyes. The evidence will consist of heavy particles known as Kaluza-Klein modes that travel in extra-dimensional space. If our theories correctly describe the world, there will be a precise enough link between such particles (which will be experimentally observed) and extra dimensions to establish the existence of extra dimensions. Dangling Particles,By LISA RANDALL, Published: September 18, 2005 New York Yimes

Saturday, July 06, 2013

Research Presentation: Oliver Gressel, Nordita

Published on Feb 7, 2013
Dr. Oliver Gressel is a postdoc at Nordita, the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, in Stockholm Sweden. Here he presents his research in theoretical astrophysics.





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Thursday, July 04, 2013

NASA | First X-Class Solar Flares of 2013




Published on May 13, 2013
On May 12-13 the sun erupted with an X1.7-class and an X2.8-class flare as well as two coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, off the upper left side of the sun. Solar material also danced and blew off the sun in what's called a prominence eruption, both in that spot and on the lower right side of the sun. This movie compiles imagery of this activity from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and from the ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory.

Music: "Long Range Cruise" by Lars Leonhard, courtesy of the artist and BineMusic. www.lars-leonhard.de


This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/...

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Consciousness, as a Biophotonic System

The structure of optical radiation emitted by the samples of loach fish eggs is studied. It was found earlier that such radiation perform the communications between distant samples, which result in the synchronization of their development. The photon radiation in form of short quasi-periodic bursts was observed for fish and frog eggs, hence the communication mechanism can be similar to the exchange of binary encoded data in the computer nets via the noisy channels. The data analysis of fish egg radiation demonstrates that in this case the information encoding is similar to the digit to time analogue algorithm. Photonic Communications and Information Encoding in Biological Systems
Of course there is some difficulty by assigning life in human form as an assumption of coordinating a life form system based entirely on computerized processes. But at the same time, there has been this struggle with coordinating the idea behind color of gravity and sonification maturation with the basis of understanding the emotive system as part of the communicating system of our experience.

 The term biophotonics denotes a combination of biology and photonics, with photonics being the science and technology of generation, manipulation, and detection of photons, quantum units of light. Photonics is related to electronics and photons.Photons play a central role in information technologies such as fiber optics the way electrons do in electronics.

So definitely,  I would want some physical process that would emulate the sensitivity with which any detector would be present in the determination of those emotions present in the system at any time during any experience.

Nobody is quite sure how cells produce biophotons but the latest thinking is that various molecular processes can emit photons and that these are transported to the cell surface by energy carying excitons. A similar process carries the energy from photons across giant protein matrices during photosynthesis. Biophoton Communication: Can Cells Talk Using Light?

The very topic(biophotonics) while verging on the one side of mysticism, it begs for sensor development processes that would delve deeper into our psychological makeup and physiological processes,  to bring understanding to the human form and endocrine system as a messenger conduit for such communications?

So of course there are many difficulties in recognizing that consciousness itself would speak too, The Photon and Emergence, suffice it is to say that, consciousness could include emotive forces that are derived from such biophoton messengers that help to define the experience?  So this in a way is a starting point for me about what such science may reveal, that we could say such psychological experiences have definitive facets in the spectrum of observation that we are not currently cataloging?





TEDx Brussels 2010 - Stuart Hameroff - Do we have a quantum Soul?

Monday, July 01, 2013

Off to Vancouver Island



We are returning to the Vancouver Island for some Rest and Relaxation. I will probably be posting from there. This time we will be with  my whole clan. My three adult children, and my 8 grandchildren.

Kye Bay


Kye Bay



Parksville



Qualicum Beach

Courtenay




See:

Kepler-22b

This diagram compares our own solar system to Kepler-22, a star system containing the first "habitable zone" planet discovered by NASA's Kepler mission. The habitable zone is the sweet spot around a star where temperatures are right for water to exist in its liquid form. Liquid water is essential for life on Earth.

Kepler-22's star is a bit smaller than our sun, so its habitable zone is slightly closer in. The diagram shows an artist's rendering of the planet comfortably orbiting within the habitable zone, similar to where Earth circles the sun. Kepler-22b has a yearly orbit of 289 days. The planet is the smallest known to orbit in the middle of the habitable zone of a sun-like star. It's about 2.4 times the size of Earth.
Image credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech

Kepler Mission Manager Update - 503 New Planet Candidates





Kepler-22b is an extrasolar planet orbiting G-type star Kepler-22.[7][8] It is located 600 light years away from Earth in the constellation of Cygnus. It was discovered by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope in 2011 and was the first known transiting planet to orbit within the habitable zone of a Sun-like star.[7][8]

Songs of the Stars: the Real Music of the Spheres



Songs of the Stars: the Real Music of the Spheres

Recording Details Speaker(s): Donald Kurtz
Collection/Series: Perimeter Institute Public Lecture Series
Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA).


Different oscillation modes penetrate to different depths inside a star.


Asteroseismology (from Greek ἀστήρ, astēr, "star"; σεισμός, seismos, "earthquake"; and -λογία, -logia) also known as stellar seismology[1][2] is the science that studies the internal structure of pulsating stars by the interpretation of their frequency spectra. Different oscillation modes penetrate to different depths inside the star. These oscillations provide information about the otherwise unobservable interiors of stars in a manner similar to how seismologists study the interior of Earth and other solid planets through the use of earthquake oscillations.[2]

Asteroseismology provides the tool to find the internal structure of stars. The pulsation frequencies give the information about the density profile of the region where the waves originate and travel. The spectrum gives the information about its chemical constituents. Both can be used to give information about the internal structure. Astroseismology effectively turns tiny variations in the star's light into sounds.[3]


Contents

Oscillations

The oscillations studied by asteroseismologists are driven by thermal energy converted into kinetic energy of pulsation. This process is similar to what goes on with any heat engine, in which heat is absorbed in the high temperature phase of oscillation and emitted when the temperature is low. The main mechanism for stars is the net conversion of radiation energy into pulsational energy in the surface layers of some classes of stars. The resulting oscillations are usually studied under the assumption that they are small, and that the star is isolated and spherically symmetric. In binary star systems, stellar tides can also have a significant influence on the star's oscillations. One application of asteroseismology is neutron stars, whose inner structure cannot be directly observed, but may be possible to infer through studies of neutron-star oscillations.[citation needed]


Wave types


Waves in sun-like stars can be divided into three different types;[4]
  • p-mode: Acoustic or pressure (p) modes,[2] driven by internal pressure fluctuations within a star; their dynamics being determined by the local speed of sound.
  • g-mode: Gravity (g) modes, driven by buoyancy,[5]
  • f-mode: Surface gravity (f) modes, akin to ocean waves along the stellar surface.[6]
Within a sun-like star, such as Alpha Centauri, the p-modes are the most prominent as the g-modes are essentially confined to the core by the convection zone. However, g-modes have been observed in white dwarf stars.[5]


Solar seismology


Helioseismology, also known as Solar seismology, is the closely related field of study focused on the Sun. Oscillations in the Sun are excited by convection in its outer layers, and observing solar-like oscillations in other stars is a new and expanding area of asteroseismology.

Space missions


A number of active spacecraft have asteroseismology studies as a significant part of their mission.
  • MOST – A Canadian satellite launched in 2003. The first spacecraft dedicated to asteroseismology.
  • COROT – A French led ESA planet-finder and asteroseismology satellite launched in 2006
  • WIRE – A NASA satellite launched in 1999. A failed infrared telescope now used for asteroseismology.
  • SOHO – A joint ESA / NASA spacecraft launched in 1995 to study the Sun.
  • Kepler – A NASA planet-finder spacecraft launched in 2009 that is currently making asteroseismology studies of over a thousand stars in its field, including the now well-studied subgiant KIC 11026764.[7][8]

Red giants and asteroseismology


Red giants are a later stage of evolution of sun-like stars after the core hydrogen fusion ceases as the fuel runs out. The outer layers of the star expand by about 200 times and the core contracts. However, there are two different stages, first one when there is fusion of hydrogen in a layer outside the core, but none of helium in the core, and then a later stage when the core is hot enough to fuse helium. Previously, these two stages could not be directly distinguished by observing the star's spectrum, and the details of these stages were incompletely understood. With the Kepler mission, asteroseismology of hundreds of relatively nearby red giants[9] enabled these two types of red giant to be distinguished. The hydrogen-shell-burning stars have gravity-mode period spacing mostly ~50 seconds and those that are also burning helium have period spacing ~100 to 300 seconds. It was assumed that, by conservation of angular momentum, the expansion of the outer layers and contraction of the core as the red giant forms would result in the core rotating faster and the outer layers slower. Asteroseismology showed this to indeed be the case[10] with the core rotating at least ten times as fast as the surface. Further asteroseismological observations could help fill in some of the remaining unknown details of star evolution.


References

  1. ^ Ghosh, Pallab (23 October 2008). "Team records 'music' from stars". BBC News. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  2. ^ a b c Guenther, David. "Solar and Stellar Seismology". Saint Mary's University. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  3. ^ Palmer, Jason (20 February 2013). "Exoplanet Kepler 37b is tiniest yet - smaller than Mercury". BBC News. Retrieved 2013-02-20.
  4. ^ Unno W, Osaki Y, Ando H, Saio H, Shibahashi H (1989). Nonradial Oscillations of Stars (2nd ed.). Tokyo, Japan: University of Tokyo Press.
  5. ^ a b Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen (June 2003). "Chapter 1" (PDF). Lecture Notes on Stellar Oscillations (5th ed.). p. 3. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  6. ^ Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen (June 2003). "Chapter 2" (PDF). Lecture Notes on Stellar Oscillations (5th ed.). p. 23. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  7. ^ Metcalfe, T. S.; et al (2010-10-25). "A Precise Asteroseismic Age and Radius for the Evolved Sun-like Star KIC 11026764". The Astrophysical Journal 723 (2): 1583. arXiv:1010.4329. Bibcode:2010ApJ...723.1583M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/723/2/1583.
  8. ^ "Graphics for 2010 Oct 26 webcast – Images from the Kepler Asteroseismology Science Consortium (KASC) webcast of 2010 Oct 26". NASA. 2010-10-26. Retrieved 3 November 2010.
  9. ^ Bedding TR, Mosser B, Huber D, Montalbaan J, et al. (Mar 2011). "Gravity modes as a way to distinguish between hydrogen- and helium-burning red giant stars". Nature 471 (7340): 608–611. arXiv:1103.5805. Bibcode:2011Natur.471..608B. doi:10.1038/nature09935. PMID 21455175.
  10. ^ Beck, Paul G.; Montalban, Josefina; Kallinger, Thomas; De Ridder, Joris; et al. (Jan 2012). "Fast core rotation in red-giant stars revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes". Nature 481 (7379): 55–57. arXiv:1112.2825. Bibcode:2012Natur.481...55B. doi:10.1038/nature10612. PMID 22158105.

 

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