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Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Adinkra Symbols(physics)

Complex ideas, complex shapes Adinkras — geometric objects that encode mathematical relationships between supersymmetric particles — are named after symbols that represent wise sayings in West African culture. This adinkra is called "nea onnim no sua a, ohu," which translates as "he who does not know can become knowledgeable through learning."
Now that we know a little bit about how adinkras can be used, we can begin to discuss what they look like. All adinkras are constructed by starting with squares, cubes and their higher-dimensional generalizations; these structures provide a "skeleton" that is then "decorated" by additional operations. Each of these decorations has a mathematical significance, which I will discuss later. For the moment, let us just concentrate on building a simple adinkra.Symbols of Power: Adinkras and the Nature of Reality


In supergravity theory and supersymmetric representation theory, Adinkra symbols are a graphical representation of supersymmetric algebras.[1][2][3][4][5] Elaborations of these graphs are reminiscent of adinkra weavings; the term is also poetically apt since SUSY Adinkras are compact fundamental physical descriptions of not only our universe but any possible universe.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ Faux, Michael; Gates, S. J. (2005). "Adinkras: A graphical technology for supersymmetric representation theory". Physical Review D 71 (6). doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.71.065002. edit
  2. ^ S. James Gates Jr.: "Superstring Theory: The DNA of Reality" (The Teaching Company)
  3. ^ S.J. Gates, Jr.: "Symbols of Power, Physics World, Vol. 23, No 6, June 2010, pp. 34 - 39"
  4. ^ S.J. Gates, Jr.: "Quarks to Cosmos"
  5. ^ S.J. Gates, Jr., and T. Hubsch, "On Dimensional Extension of Supersymmetry: From Worldlines to Worldsheets"

External links



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As in context of Adinkras as a language development, Feynman drawings are illustrative of the language developed to see physic decay processes created by describing collisions of elementary particles. So one might find that history important.

In this Feynman diagram, an electron and a positron annihilate, producing a photon (represented by the blue sine wave) that becomes a quark-antiquark pair, after which one particle radiates a gluon (represented by the green spiral).


Sometimes there is a need to see the use of powers of ten to explained the drive perspective requires to levels that one might have not considered before. Maybe indeed even to abstract spaces that while not being mathematically endowed,  could take us ever deeper into the reality then we had never seen before.

Part of that process is seeing what underlays happenings within nature, that you were not aware of before and that's why the need to see quantum processes at work within context of seeing superficially at what lays all around us.

You are requiring the need to drive physics in correlation with the biological necessity of merging theoretic in physics with natural processes.

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