Thursday, November 09, 2006

The Cosmic Connection to Climate


Cars and industrial activity contribute to the 7 gigatons of carbon dioxide released each year into the atmosphere.Credits: EuroNews

Some thoughts about this were being contemplates as I was slowly awaking this morning. I was actually thinking of one more image about seeing Gr being measured by how Grace is looking at and being used to look at the planet in other ways as well.



I'll add that later.

Variation of Cosmic ray flux and Global cloud coverage by Henri Svensmark and Eigil Friis-Christensen, 26 NOvember 1996

Some historical perspective about eight years ago below here raises question about what this cosmic connection might mean from a wider perspective.

CERN plans global-warming experiment(1998)

A controversial theory proposing that cosmic rays are responsible for global warming is to be put to the test at CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics. Put forward two years ago by two Danish scientists, Henrik Svensmark and Eigil Friis-Christensen, the theory suggests that it is changes in the Sun's magnetic field, and not the emission of greenhouse gases, that has led to recent rises in global temperatures.

Experimentalists at CERN will use a cloud chamber to mimic the Earth's atmosphere in order to try and determine whether cloud formation is influenced by solar activity. According to the Danish theory, charged particles from the Sun deflect galactic cosmic rays (streams of high-energy particles from outer space) that would otherwise have ionized the Earth's lower atmosphere and formed clouds.


Looking at this places some extra thinking about what could be taking place in the cosmos, effectively creating the circumstance "also" for changes with regard to earth's climate?



At what point would such intensity of the event in the cosmos cause the larger scenario to be played out, that it also, may have been a contributing factor to what we think about global warming here?



See this link here for further thoughts about the increase in the "lighthouse effect" and how such intensities may be considered in light of the following thoughts being demonstrated here.


This is not to dissuade people from thinking about the current considerations that are man made but raised questions in my mind about the consequences of other factors which may or may not be contributing to global climate changes.

A missing link in climate theory

The Danish National Space Center (DNSC) is a research center under the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation. The research activities include astrophysics, solar system physics, geodesy and space technology.
The experimental results lend strong empirical support to the theory proposed a decade ago by Henrik Svensmark and Eigil Friis-Christensen that cosmic rays influence Earth’s climate through their effect on cloud formation. The original theory rested on data showing a strong correlation between variation in the intensity of cosmic radiation penetrating the atmosphere and the amount of low-altitude clouds. Cloud cover increases when the intensity of cosmic rays grows and decreases when the intensity declines.

It is known that low-altitude clouds have an overall cooling effect on the Earth’s surface. Hence, variations in cloud cover caused by cosmic rays can change the surface temperature. The existence of such a cosmic connection to Earth’s climate might thus help to explain past and present variations in Earth’s climate.

Interestingly, during the 20th Century, the Sun’s magnetic field which shields Earth from cosmic rays more than doubled, thereby reducing the average influx of cosmic rays. The resulting reduction in cloudiness, especially of low-altitude clouds, may be a significant factor in the global warming Earth has undergone during the last century. However, until now, there has been no experimental evidence of how the causal mechanism linking cosmic rays and cloud formation may work.

‘Many climate scientists have considered the linkages from cosmic rays to clouds to climate as unproven,’ comments Eigil Friis-Christensen, who is now Director of the Danish National Space Center. ‘Some said there was no conceivable way in which cosmic rays could influence cloud cover. The SKY experiment now shows how they do so, and should help to put the cosmic-ray connection firmly onto the agenda of international climate research.’